Please don’t “like” and don’t “follow” us on Facebook, Twitter etc.

I’ve finally decided that it is time to disconnect from all social media. No FB, no Twitter, or any other platform. My reasons for doing so are varied but they include the reasons that have been discussed in public (from Cambridge Analytica and earlier). I also believe that these social media companies are, in essence, vile in their methods of manipulating users into addiction so as to focus primarily on their bottom line.  However, you don’t have to take my word for it, there are plenty of articles on books, based on peer reviewed research, that support this point. You might start by reading internet pioneer Jaron Lanier’s book “Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now.” Here is a review of this book. 

It isn’t enough to blame these big companies but we must also start with ourselves; i.e. the ‘users’.  If there weren’t so many people on FB etc. then there wouldn’t be an FB etc.  As Jaron writes ““If you’re not part of the solution, there will be no solution.”

Lastly, Lanier’s book makes an important point that I’ll quote from a NY Times review below. Read this and think about it.

“[Lanier’s] argument, however, is a profound one. He worries that our reliance on big tech companies is ruining our capacity for spirituality, by turning us into robotic extensions of their machines. The companies, he argues, have no appreciation for the “mystical spark inside you.” They don’t understand the magic of human consciousness and, therefore, will recklessly destroy it.”

Professionally, FB and Twitter were not all that useful because the work that I do involves face to face relationships that require a trust that is built over time.  In addition, it is impossible to keep up with 600 or so ‘Friends’, many of whom I’d never met, even though I was grateful for their reaching out to me. Instead, I prefer to meet people, whenever possible, in person or to be in touch in other ways (old fashioned e-mail, or better yet a letter!). No I’m not a luddite but I’m also not the only one making these points.

Frankly, I feel great without FB in my life any more. Try it 🙂

OK. Enough of this. Back to work!

In memoriam Oliver Knussen

The news of Oliver Knussen’s untimely passing came to me last night via e-mail. I was deeply saddened to hear this as Knussen was only 66. As far as I’m concerned, Knussen (or ‘Olly’ to those who knew him), was one of the greatest composers, conductors and musical minds of his generation. His music moved me deeply and inspires me constantly. Last year, I composed a work for solo piano titled Soliloquia No. 1 and I dedicated it to Mr. Knussen. Earlier this year I had planned on mailing it to him with a letter thanking him for all the inspiration his music has given. However, I was too self conscious and shy to follow through with this, which is something that I regret very much.

Rest in peace, Olly.

There is a beautiful tribute in the LA Times by Mark Swed here.

Violin Concerto No. 1 – Update No. 1

My first violin concerto is commissioned by the Pierre Boulez Saal, through the Daniel Barenboim Foundation, for violinist Michael Barenboim and the Pierre Boulez Ensemble. It will premiere on March 6th, 2019 in Berlin at the Pierre Boulez Saal.  Details about the concert are here.  I began working on this new commission, in earnest, in mid-May, but ideas about it have been around for a few years.

The violin concerto is inspired by a moment, that came and went, at a rehearsal in 2014. At the time I had no idea that this ‘moment’ would inspire a violin concerto but I was quite certain that there was a piece to be weaved from it. This ‘moment’ occured during the summer of 2014, when I had the opportunity to travel to Buenos Aires for the premiere of my Ramal for orchestra by the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra and Maestro Daniel Barenboim.  During one of the rehearsals, the orchestra was rehearsing Mozart’s piano concerto No. 27. A number of bars into the first movement, D.B. stopped the orchestra to focus on a line that wasn’t played correctly. He focused in on this first violin line:

Bar 137 – 139 from Mozart’s piano concerto No. 27, first movement.

The exact phrase can be heard here.

The reaction to this phrase, played on without the bass line and the inner voices, by the Arab violinists was an immediate hearing of the maqam Hijaz. So they began improvising in the Arabic style, but just for an instant.  Like many wonderful but ephemeral moments in life, it was an inspirational moment that it stayed with me all these years.

Doubtless, my recollection of it has also changed. However, this phrase, and the reaction to it, are now at the heart of my violin concerto. On some level, I suppose I’m interested in why Mozart, and later Beethoven, were attracted to these ‘oriental’ figures. Also, why later they became grotesque ‘orientalist’ pieces that have caused all kinds of misunderstanding between “East & West”.  But there is also some cause for optimism that these kinds of intersections can resonate across boundaries and cultures.

I know what you are thinking, but my training in ethnomusicology long ago taught me to bury the notion that ‘music is a universal language.’ It isn’t. However, there are some commonalities and that are undeniable. For this violin concerto, the danger of slipping down the slope of orientalist shlock is very real, but the possible rewards for navigating this treacherous path are also great, and very inviting.

This phrase, transposed up a fifth from the original Mozart key of Bb, is at the heart of the harmonic and melodic language of this violin concerto:

With a little work, and imagination the above can yield this harmony-mood-feeling (we need a word for this):

In terms of maqam (Arab music scalar system), I hear it along these lines (kind of a hyper maqam Saba on C#):

But more on this later.

From here the journey begins.

BTW… why am I calling this work Violin Concerto No. 1? Because No. 2 is already in the works. More on that later.